Reply to Paul Guyer

 

ROBERT CLEWIS | The Kantian Sublime and the Revelation of Freedom | Cambridge University Press 2009


 

By Robert Clewis 

In his thought-provoking comments, Paul Guyer raises interesting questions about revelation as a form of knowledge, the possibility of free as well as dependent sublimity, and the moral sublime as a distinct category of the sublime and as dependent sublimity. I address these issues in turn. Fortunately, Guyer and I appear to be largely in agreement.

Read more

Advertisements

Paul Guyer on Robert Clewis’s “The Kantian Sublime and the Revelation of Freedom”

 

ROBERT CLEWIS | The Kantian Sublime and the Revelation of Freedom | Cambridge University Press 2009


 

By Paul Guyer 

Robert Clewis’s book The Kantian Sublime and the Revelation of Freedom is a rich and thoughtful examination of Kant’s concept of the sublime, of the interface between Kant’s aesthetics and his practical philosophy, and of Kant’s attitude toward moral enthusiasm, which he effectively argues is by no means entirely negative but also has a positive role to play in Kant’s account of political progress. In my comments, I want to focus on several issues concerning the sublime more than enthusiasm. Read more

Melissa Zinkin on Robert Clewis’s “The Kantian Sublime and the Revelation of Freedom”

 

ROBERT CLEWIS | The Kantian Sublime and the Revelation of Freedom | Cambridge University Press 2009


 

By Melissa Zinkin 

Since the 1980s, there has been a steady stream of writings on the sublime, many of which make use of Kant’s concept of the sublime. But there has been only a handful of sustained scholarly works on the sublime in Kant. Clewis’s book, which emphasizes the connection between the sublime and enthusiasm in Kant’s writings, tracing Kant’s thoughts on these topics back to his early work, is a very welcome addition to Kant scholarship. The underlying question that the book is concerned with is how to reconcile what seem to be Kant’s contradictory views on the French Revolution. On the one hand, in his political writings, Kant unequivocally condemns all revolution as being against public right. Yet, on the other hand, in The Conflict of the Faculties, Kant writes that he sees in the enthusiasm of the onlookers to the French revolution a moral predisposition and a hope for progress. Kant writes of the French Revolution: Read more